Essay 3, Draft 1

Response to: The Cut-up Method by Brion Gysin

The Cut-up Method and Deconstructing “Salome”

It is a great dichotomy of human existence that we simultaneously strive to construct and deconstruct order on our world. There is an incalculable mass of constantly shifting stimuli that must be interpreted, organized and understood. In that process, there is a necessary giving up. We push away the perceptions that do not fit into the boundaries that we create. We lock those things in small, dark corner of our minds where they won’t make us any trouble. And then, whether we acknowledge it or not, we miss those lost things. We miss them because sometimes it is the things outside that are the most sublime.  The Cut-up Method by Brion Gysin gives us one way to access the deconstructed impressions we thought we did not want.

The Cut-up Method is an experimental combination of art and literature. The process literally cuts texts into pieces and reassembles them in relatively random order. There are several different methods by which the words can be cut up and reassembled. Texts can be dissected and reassembled word by word, line by line or using a variety of patterns and strategies depending on the goals of the artist. The deconstruction of the text facilitates new interpretations of existing text and can also become a method to produce innovative new work.

Language is a force of order. It maintains a strangle-hold on our minds. It is the means of thought by which most people interpret, organize and comprehend their perceptions. To give it voice, validates and solidifies those thoughts. Written language is even more fixed and limited than the language of thought or voice. We read words in a sequential order. We interpret and we judge meaning. Even the works of the most daring and experimental authors do not fully escape the binding force of linguistic law. They may rage against the bars but they are still contained. The Cut-up Method is a tool of that rage. The words are cut up, the structure is made irrelevant. The viewer is free to look at each word outside the prescribed boundaries. It is a method that allows new interpretations.

Randomness is a force of disorder. The randomness in the Cut-up Method is the power to set us free the usual rational, ordered thinking used to process text. However, the method does not remove meaning. It gives us a new way to perceive it.

While randomness is an important part of the Cut-up Method, the method cannot be considered fully random. There is an element of choice. It could be argued that subconscious considerations govern the dissection and reassembling of the words, but even if it is possible to remove those influenced, there is still choice in the selection. The words may be arranged in relatively random order but the texts are selected. They are chosen by the artists. If the artist chooses a text that is powerful, changing the order of the words will not remove the power. It will only transmute it into something new.

The text below is a comparison of the original poem “Salome” by Carol Anne Duffy and a Word-by-Word Cut-up of the same text.

“Salome” by Carol Ann Duffy

 

I’d done it before

(and doubtless I’ll do it again,

sooner or later)

woke up with a head on the pillow beside me – whose? –

what did it matter?

 

Good-looking, of course, dark hair, rather matted;

the reddish beard several shades lighter;

with very deep lines around the eyes,

from pain, I’d guess, maybe laughter;

and a beautiful crimson mouth that obviously knew

how to flatter…

which I kissed…

Colder than pewter.

Strange. What was his name? Peter?

 

Simon? Andrew? John? I knew I’d feel better

for tea, dry toast, no butter,

so rang for the maid.

And, indeed, her innocent clatter

of cups and plates,

her clearing of clutter,

her regional patter,

were just what I needed –

hungover and wrecked as I was from a night on the batter.

 

Never again!

I needed to clean up my act,

get fitter,

cut out the booze and the fags and the sex.

Yes. And as for the latter,

it was time to turf out the blighter,

the beater or biter,

who’d come like a lamb to the slaughter

to Salome’s bed.

 

In the mirror, I saw my eyes glitter.

I flung back the sticky red sheets,

and there, like I said – and ain’t life a bitch –

was his head on a platter.

“Salome” Cut-up by Destin Black

 

a  head  hungover bitch– , around flatter it maybe my pain pillow sticky that turf – And do for how innocent lines or Simon there –, and matted out so to woke  – batter feel John name platter the to wrecked  –, a beard Colder dry head to what Yes!, , , again beautiful fags his just needed rang the to up what with, ?act before butter eyes her kissed needed rather toast were whose, again beside clatter his knew Never red was ? and biter Crimson I, I’ll the was,  clean I knew like night on reddish shades was ain’t . ? cups get I lamb no regional.… and deep glitter indeed later obviously said the. and did from like on sheets and from? And cut,. and dark hair In the was …latter of Salome’s , as blighter fitter it to with me patter Strange I’d the, ;a beater come doubtless her mirror Peter tea which, , back it my plates the What , ; a bed clutter eyes her  I’d laughter of saw the who’d I the , . ? a and clearing Good-looking I lighter on sex the very , and done for it maid or slaughter time , up, . a as booze I I the the, for Andrew matter out sooner. ; guess I I’d life mouth of course pewter several than the the, flung

 

* The punctuation was included because the punctuation chosen by a poet is an essential element of the text.

The poem “Salome” was selected for Cut-up because it contains an evident structure and strong language. The strength of the language should persevere even when the structure is lost. The narrator is telling a story about her experience. She woke up after a night of debauchery to find a decapitated corpse in her bed. The poem alludes to the biblical mythology surrounding Salome, the dancer who demanded the head of John the Baptist. The author published the poem in an anthology featuring poetry from the perspective of famous women in history. The contextual knowledge and clear narrative combine to make the initial interpretation fairly simple. It is a poem about a woman who is questioning the validity of her life choices. It directly opposes traditional, patriarchal views of womanhood. The reader is left to question whether the narrator is a criminal or a victim lashing out.

The Cut-up Poem was as randomized as possible. It was divided up into individual words and punctuation. Then it was reassembled in random order.  Considering the Cut-up shifts the interpretation. Looking at each word individually without narrative flow highlights the violence of the poem. Words like “bitch, cut” and “dark” stand out more abruptly. The sound devices also become more obvious. The repletion of hard sounds like “matted, batter, beater” and blighter” are disruptive in the Cut-up. Without structure, they lack the rhythm of the original text. It is easier to hear the sounds. Each “tt” is a physical blow. Comparing the original poem to the Cut-up shows us that the poem may be darkly humorous, but it is also quite a serious response to a patriarchal society. It shows the violence that hides under the surface of acceptance. The Cut-up becomes a tool for analysis rather than an art in and of itself.

The Cut-up Method can also be a method to create unique art. The Cut-up of “Salome” below has had all punctuation and articles were removed. The font was  switched to uppercase. This was done so that the individual words could be considered without influence of structure. The title was also changed so that the view is independent of the original text. Each repetition of the text has eliminated words based on size: 1, 2 or 3 letter words, 3 letter words, 5 letter words, 6 letter words, 7 letter words, 8 letter words, 9 letter words.

“A POEM BY CAD” CUT-UP AND CUT DOWN BY DESTIN BLACK

HEAD HUNGOVER BITCH  AROUND FLATTER IT MAYBE MY PAIN PILLOW STICKY THAT TURF AND DO FOR HOW INNOCENT LINES OR SIMON THERE AND MATTED OUT SO TO WOKE BATTER FEEL JOHN NAME PLATTER TO WRECKED BEARD COLDER DRY HEAD TO WHAT YES AGAIN BEAUTIFUL FAGS HIS JUST NEEDED RANG TO UP WHAT WITH ACT BEFORE BUTTER EYES HER KISSED NEEDED RATHER TOAST WERE WHOSE AGAIN BESIDE CLATTER HIS KNEW NEVER RED WAS AND BITER CRIMSON I ILL THE WAS CLEAN I KNEW LIKE NIGHT ON REDDISH SHADES WAS AINT  CUPS GET I LAMB NO REGIONAL AND DEEP GLITTER INDEED LATER OBVIOUSLY SAID AND DID FROM LIKE ON SHEETS AND FROM AND CUT AND DARK HAIR IN THE WAS LATTER OF SALOMES AS BLIGHTER FITTER IT TO WITH ME PATTER STRANGE ID THE BEATER COME DOUBTLESS HER MIRROR PETER TEA WHICH BACK IT MY PLATES THE WHAT A BED CLUTTER EYES HER  ID LAUGHTER OF SAW THE WHOD I AND CLEARING GOODLOOKING I LIGHTER ON SEX THE VERY AND DONE FOR IT MAID OR SLAUGHTER TIME UP AS BOOZE I I FOR ANDREW MATTER OUT SOONER GUESS I ID LIFE MOUTH OF COURSE PEWTER SEVERAL THAN FLUNG

HEAD HUNGOVER BITCH  AROUND FLATTER MAYBE PAIN PILLOW STICKY THAT TURF INNOCENT LINES SIMON THERE MATTED WOKE BATTER FEEL JOHN NAME PLATTER WRECKED BEARD COLDER HEAD WHAT AGAIN BEAUTIFUL FAGS JUST NEEDED RANG WHAT WITH BEFORE BUTTER EYES KISSED NEEDED RATHER TOAST WERE WHOSE AGAIN BESIDE CLATTER KNEW NEVER BITER CRIMSON CLEAN KNEW LIKE NIGHT REDDISH SHADES AINT  CUPS LAMB REGIONAL DEEP GLITTER INDEED LATER OBVIOUSLY SAID FROM SHEETS FROM DARK HAIR LATTER SALOMES BLIGHTER FITTER WITH PATTER STRANGE BEATER COME DOUBTLESS MIRROR PETER WHICH BACK PLATES WHAT CLUTTER EYES LAUGHTER WHOD CLEARING GOODLOOKING I LIGHTER VERY DONE MAID SLAUGHTER TIME BOOZE ANDREW MATTER SOONER GUESS LIFE MOUTH COURSE PEWTER SEVERAL THAN FLUNG

HUNGOVER BITCH AROUND FLATTER MAYBE PILLOW STICKY INNOCENT LINES SIMON THERE MATTED BATTER PLATTER WRECKED BEARD COLDER AGAIN BEAUTIFUL NEEDED BEFORE BUTTER KISSED NEEDED RATHER TOAST WHOSE AGAIN BESIDE CLATTER NEVER BITER CRIMSON CLEAN NIGHT REDDISH SHADES REGIONAL GLITTER INDEED LATER OBVIOUSLY SHEETS LATTER SALOMES BLIGHTER FITTER PATTER STRANGE BEATER DOUBTLESS MIRROR PETER WHICH PLATES CLUTTER LAUGHTER CLEARING GOODLOOKING LIGHTER SLAUGHTER ANDREW MATTER SOONER GUESS MOUTH COURSE PEWTER SEVERAL FLUNG

HUNGOVER AROUND FLATTER PILLOW STICKY INNOCENT MATTED BATTER PLATTER WRECKED COLDER BEAUTIFUL NEEDED BEFORE BUTTER KISSED NEEDED RATHER BESIDE CLATTER CRIMSON REDDISH SHADES REGIONAL GLITTER INDEED OBVIOUSLY SHEETS LATTER SALOMES BLIGHTER FITTER PATTER STRANGE DOUBTLESS MIRROR PLATES CLUTTER LAUGHTER CLEARING GOODLOOKING LIGHTER SLAUGHTER BOOZE ANDREW MATTER SOONER COURSE PEWTER SEVERAL

HUNGOVER FLATTER INNOCENT PLATTER WRECKED BEAUTIFUL CLATTER CRIMSON REDDISH REGIONAL GLITTER OBVIOUSLY SALOMES BLIGHTER STRANGE DOUBTLESS CLUTTER LAUGHTER CLEARING GOODLOOKING LIGHTER SLAUGHTER SEVERAL

HUNGOVER INNOCENT BEAUTIFUL REGIONAL OBVIOUSLY BLIGHTER DOUBTLESS LAUGHTER CLEARING GOODLOOKING SLAUGHTER

BEAUTIFUL  OBVIOUSLY DOUBTLESS GOODLOOKING SLAUGHTER

GOODLOOKING

 

Essay 3, Notes From Professor Aldrich
Response to: The Cut-up Method by Brion Gysin

The Cut-up Method and Deconstructing “Salome”

It is a great dichotomy of human existence that we simultaneously strive to construct and deconstruct order on our world. There is an incalculable mass of constantly shifting stimuli that must be interpreted, organized and understood. In that process, there is a necessary giving up. We push away the perceptions that do not fit into the boundaries that we create. We lock those things in small, dark corner of our minds where they won’t make us any trouble. And then, whether we acknowledge it or not, we miss those lost things. We miss them because sometimes it is the things outside that are the most sublime. The Cut-up Method by Brion Gysin gives us one way to access the deconstructed impressions we thought we did not want.

… I take your point, but you may want to have a quick go at deconstruction as the term is coined/unfurled by Derrida… you may not mean deconstruct here…

Philosophy: Jacques Derrida


o Short Biography
o Deconstruction
o used the term to describe his way of thinking about things
o when other people used it he often felt they misunderstood him
o Means dismantling our excessive loyalty to any idea. Learning to see aspects of the truth that might lay buried in its opposite
o 1967 Of Grammatology
o overt topic ->
o since Socrates, speech privileged over writing, which is regarded as a mere transcript of what people might say, second hand report lacking truthfulness of conversation
o bigger idea
o vast proposition
o almost all our thinking is riddled with a false privileging of 1 thing over another
o speech over writing, words over pictures, sight over touch, etc
o failure to see merits and values of a supposedly lesser part of the equation
o stressing that neglected counterparts are worthy of attention
o deconstructed a range of key binary terms throughout his books
o learn to see both sides, see they are both a bit wrong, both needed each other, tension always irrevocable
o both sides needed each other
o it might seem he attacks tradition?
o but no… more subtle
o example: in deconstruction of equality
o proposed that assertion equality is always better is unstable and obscure
o pointed out some of best situations are not examples of equality in action
o i.e. pupils and teachers and children’s and parents
o to deconstruct an idea is to show that an idea is confused and riddled with logical defects
o must keep messiness sin mind
o criticizing tendency to think all problem has good and neat solution
o craving to answer all is the root of troubles
o comfortable with constantly oscillating nature of wisdom
o not one or another, multiple views
o Aporia
o Greek word
o impasse or puzzlement
o a state we should be proud to know or visit regularly
o confusion or doubt not bad
o evidence of adulthood of the mind
o Logocentrism
o over hasty naive devotion to reason and logic
o faith in language as natural and best way to communicate
o stressed that many of the most important things we feel can’t be neatly expressed in words
o disliked prestige of the idea of IQ measures logic
o largely ignores other qualities of mind
o friendship, parent. etc
o certain people might not be brilliant at geometry but might have emotional skills, social etc
o casting doubts on foundations of modern intellectual world view
o can be cherished as a corrective to some overzealous attitudes
o he knew some hierarchies were good, kindness over cruelty
o but knew sometimes we dismissed because opposites basked in arbitrary status
o what are values in overlooked ideas
o why is it good, to be always on the other side?

Note: I read first. Then the Youtube videos makes it easier to take notes. I like the process of summarizing as I think. It helps me think.

Link: About Derrida

So a text, or well… everything, can’t be understood to have absolute meaning. More to the point, the commonly accepted conceived meaning may be due to privileging of one idea over another without that privilege being truly necessary or valid. It is important, and desirable, to exist in a state of “not sure” so that we are able to open our minds and consider alternative views. Very little is ever black/white, absolute etc.

So…. Did I mean “deconstruct” in my essay? I did not. at the time. I meant “deconstruct” as in “take apart the construction of the poem” separate the words from lines from stanzas. However, upon reflection, maybe I did mean it a little. The cut-up method certainly seems to be an excellent way to apply Derridas thinking. You certainly do remove the privilege of grammar over definition and you alter the connotation of words heavily so that you must look at the text from a different perspective than you otherwise would.

I don’t know if that means I should write about that in the essay but it’s an interesting thought.

The Cut-up Method is an experimental combination of art and literature. The process literally cuts texts into pieces and reassembles them in relatively random order. There are several different methods by which the words can be cut up and reassembled. Texts can be dissected and reassembled word by word, line by line or using a variety of patterns and strategies depending on the goals of the artist. The deconstruction of the text facilitates new interpretations of existing text and can also become a method to produce innovative new work.

Language is a force of order. It maintains a strangle-hold on our minds. It is the means of thought by which most people interpret, organize and comprehend their perceptions. To give it voice, validates and solidifies those thoughts. Written language is even more fixed and limited than the language of thought … is there a language of thought different from voice?… or voice. We read words in a sequential order. We interpret and we judge meaning. Even the works of the most daring and experimental authors do not fully escape the binding force of linguistic law. They may rage against the bars but they are still contained. The Cut-up Method is a tool of that rage. The words are cut up, the structure is made irrelevant. The viewer is free to look at each word outside the prescribed boundaries. It is a method that allows new interpretations.

Well… Derrida seems to think there is. I think that I agree with him. I have been telling students for many years that people write poetry because some ideas are simply too nebulous, to difficult for words and yet the only way they know to express them is words so they create poetry that allows them to abstract their meaning. When you add to that, sensory perception, then I think it becomes more true. When we are born, we don’t know words, but that doesn’t imply that we don’t think. We just exist in a world of emotion and sensory input. I think it is terribly difficult for adults who have language to access that kind of thought, but I think we have moments when we can.

Again, not sure if it belongs in the essay or not.

Randomness is a force of disorder. The randomness in the Cut-up Method is the power to set us free the usual rational, ordered thinking used to process text. However, the method does not remove meaning. It gives us a new way to perceive it.

While randomness is an important part of the Cut-up Method, the method cannot be considered fully random. There is an element of choice. It could be argued … and Burroughs does… that subconscious considerations govern the dissection and reassembling of the words, but even if it is possible to remove those influenced, there is still choice in the selection. The words may be arranged in relatively random order but the texts are selected. They are chosen by the artists. If the artist chooses a text that is powerful, changing the order of the words will not remove the power. It will only transmute it into something new.

I should have said that. I knew that he did, and it should have been stated rather than leaving it vague and implying it was a purely original thought.

…right, thus where you start is extremely important, not just the original idea but the original impulse to do…

That is true and worthy of perhaps another section to the essay. I think that helps explain the idea of the cut-up Method as art in and of itself.

The text below is a comparison of the original poem “Salome” by Carol Anne Duffy and a Word-by-Word Cut-up of the same text.

“Salome” by Carol Ann Duffy

I’d done it before

(and doubtless I’ll do it again,

sooner or later)

woke up with a head on the pillow beside me – whose? –

what did it matter?

Good-looking, of course, dark hair, rather matted;

the reddish beard several shades lighter;

with very deep lines around the eyes,

from pain, I’d guess, maybe laughter;

and a beautiful crimson mouth that obviously knew

how to flatter…

which I kissed…

Colder than pewter.

Strange. What was his name? Peter?

Simon? Andrew? John? I knew I’d feel better

for tea, dry toast, no butter,

so rang for the maid.

And, indeed, her innocent clatter

of cups and plates,

her clearing of clutter,

her regional patter,

were just what I needed –

hungover and wrecked as I was from a night on the batter.

Never again!

I needed to clean up my act,

get fitter,

cut out the booze and the fags and the sex.

Yes. And as for the latter,

it was time to turf out the blighter,

the beater or biter,

who’d come like a lamb to the slaughter

to Salome’s bed.

In the mirror, I saw my eyes glitter.

I flung back the sticky red sheets,

and there, like I said – and ain’t life a bitch –

was his head on a platter.

“Salome” Cut-up by Destin Black

a  head  hungover bitch– , around flatter it maybe my pain pillow sticky that turf – And do for how innocent lines or Simon there –, and matted out so to woke  – batter feel John name platter the to wrecked  –, a beard Colder dry head to what Yes!, , , again beautiful fags his just needed rang the to up what with, ?act before butter eyes her kissed needed rather toast were whose, again beside clatter his knew Never red was ? and biter Crimson I, I’ll the was,  clean I knew like night on reddish shades was ain’t . ? cups get I lamb no regional.… and deep glitter indeed later obviously said the. and did from like on sheets and from? And cut,. and dark hair In the was …latter of Salome’s , as blighter fitter it to with me patter Strange I’d the, ;a beater come doubtless her mirror Peter tea which, , back it my plates the What , ; a bed clutter eyes her  I’d laughter of saw the who’d I the , . ? a and clearing Good-looking I lighter on sex the very , and done for it maid or slaughter time , up, . a as booze I I the the, for Andrew matter out sooner. ; guess I I’d life mouth of course pewter several than the the, flung

* The punctuation was included because the punctuation chosen by a poet is an essential element of the text.

The poem “Salome” was selected for Cut-up because it contains an evident structure and strong language. The strength of the language should persevere even when the structure is lost. The narrator is telling a story about her experience. She woke up after a night of debauchery to find a decapitated corpse in her bed. The poem alludes to the biblical mythology surrounding Salome, the dancer who demanded the head of John the Baptist. The author published the poem in an anthology featuring poetry from the perspective of famous women in history. The contextual knowledge and clear narrative combine to make the initial interpretation fairly simple. It is a poem about a woman who is questioning the validity of her life choices. It directly opposes traditional, patriarchal views of womanhood. The reader is left to question whether the narrator is a criminal or a victim lashing out.

The Cut-up Poem was as randomized as possible. It was divided up into individual words and punctuation. Then it was reassembled in random order. …and here is where method is important!… Considering the Cut-up shifts the interpretation. Looking at each word individually without narrative flow highlights the violence of the poem. Words like “bitch, cut” and “dark” stand out more abruptly. The sound devices also become more obvious. The repletion of hard sounds like “matted, batter, beater” and blighter” are disruptive in the Cut-up. Without structure, they lack the rhythm of the original text. It is easier to hear the sounds. Each “tt” is a physical blow. Comparing the original poem to the Cut-up shows us that the poem may be darkly humorous, but it is also quite a serious response to a patriarchal society. It shows the violence that hides under the surface of acceptance. The Cut-up becomes a tool for analysis rather than an art in and of itself. …or both, not either/or….

Should I have described the method more? I actually didn’t physically cut it up because I had no printer. I used a computer to alphabetize the words. Then I turned the text white so I could not see it. I made a list of random numbers and letters and put them in a column. Then I alphabetized it again by the new column. I repeated this three times to get things as random as I could.

I considered that the analysis itself was an art, but I think my view of art narrowed and defeated my initial thought. I second guessed myself and decided that analysis was a separate thing.

The Cut-up Method can also be a method to create unique art. The Cut-up of “Salome” below has had all punctuation and articles were removed. The font was switched to uppercase. This was done so that the individual words could be considered without influence of structure. The title was also changed so that the view is independent of the original text. Each repetition of the text has eliminated words based on size: 1, 2 or 3 letter words, 3 letter words, 5 letter words, 6 letter words, 7 letter words, 8 letter words, 9 letter words. … a serial method!…

That was purposeful. I wanted to combine the randomness of the text selection with the structure of the serial reduction. I probably should have noted that.

“A POEM BY CAD” CUT-UP AND CUT DOWN BY DESTIN BLACK

HEAD HUNGOVER BITCH AROUND FLATTER IT MAYBE MY PAIN PILLOW STICKY THAT TURF AND DO FOR HOW INNOCENT LINES OR SIMON THERE AND MATTED OUT SO TO WOKE BATTER FEEL JOHN NAME PLATTER TO WRECKED BEARD COLDER DRY HEAD TO WHAT YES AGAIN BEAUTIFUL FAGS HIS JUST NEEDED RANG TO UP WHAT WITH ACT BEFORE BUTTER EYES HER KISSED NEEDED RATHER TOAST WERE WHOSE AGAIN BESIDE CLATTER HIS KNEW NEVER RED WAS AND BITER CRIMSON I ILL THE WAS CLEAN I KNEW LIKE NIGHT ON REDDISH SHADES WAS AINT CUPS GET I LAMB NO REGIONAL AND DEEP GLITTER INDEED LATER OBVIOUSLY SAID AND DID FROM LIKE ON SHEETS AND FROM AND CUT AND DARK HAIR IN THE WAS LATTER OF SALOMES AS BLIGHTER FITTER IT TO WITH ME PATTER STRANGE ID THE BEATER COME DOUBTLESS HER MIRROR PETER TEA WHICH BACK IT MY PLATES THE WHAT A BED CLUTTER EYES HER ID LAUGHTER OF SAW THE WHOD I AND CLEARING GOODLOOKING I LIGHTER ON SEX THE VERY AND DONE FOR IT MAID OR SLAUGHTER TIME UP AS BOOZE I I FOR ANDREW MATTER OUT SOONER GUESS I ID LIFE MOUTH OF COURSE PEWTER SEVERAL THAN FLUNG

HEAD HUNGOVER BITCH AROUND FLATTER MAYBE PAIN PILLOW STICKY THAT TURF INNOCENT LINES SIMON THERE MATTED WOKE BATTER FEEL JOHN NAME PLATTER WRECKED BEARD COLDER HEAD WHAT AGAIN BEAUTIFUL FAGS JUST NEEDED RANG WHAT WITH BEFORE BUTTER EYES KISSED NEEDED RATHER TOAST WERE WHOSE AGAIN BESIDE CLATTER KNEW NEVER BITER CRIMSON CLEAN KNEW LIKE NIGHT REDDISH SHADES AINT CUPS LAMB REGIONAL DEEP GLITTER INDEED LATER OBVIOUSLY SAID FROM SHEETS FROM DARK HAIR LATTER SALOMES BLIGHTER FITTER WITH PATTER STRANGE BEATER COME DOUBTLESS MIRROR PETER WHICH BACK PLATES WHAT CLUTTER EYES LAUGHTER WHOD CLEARING GOODLOOKING I LIGHTER VERY DONE MAID SLAUGHTER TIME BOOZE ANDREW MATTER SOONER GUESS LIFE MOUTH COURSE PEWTER SEVERAL THAN FLUNG

HUNGOVER BITCH AROUND FLATTER MAYBE PILLOW STICKY INNOCENT LINES SIMON THERE MATTED BATTER PLATTER WRECKED BEARD COLDER AGAIN BEAUTIFUL NEEDED BEFORE BUTTER KISSED NEEDED RATHER TOAST WHOSE AGAIN BESIDE CLATTER NEVER BITER CRIMSON CLEAN NIGHT REDDISH SHADES REGIONAL GLITTER INDEED LATER OBVIOUSLY SHEETS LATTER SALOMES BLIGHTER FITTER PATTER STRANGE BEATER DOUBTLESS MIRROR PETER WHICH PLATES CLUTTER LAUGHTER CLEARING GOODLOOKING LIGHTER SLAUGHTER ANDREW MATTER SOONER GUESS MOUTH COURSE PEWTER SEVERAL FLUNG

HUNGOVER AROUND FLATTER PILLOW STICKY INNOCENT MATTED BATTER PLATTER WRECKED COLDER BEAUTIFUL NEEDED BEFORE BUTTER KISSED NEEDED RATHER BESIDE CLATTER CRIMSON REDDISH SHADES REGIONAL GLITTER INDEED OBVIOUSLY SHEETS LATTER SALOMES BLIGHTER FITTER PATTER STRANGE DOUBTLESS MIRROR PLATES CLUTTER LAUGHTER CLEARING GOODLOOKING LIGHTER SLAUGHTER BOOZE ANDREW MATTER SOONER COURSE PEWTER SEVERAL

HUNGOVER FLATTER INNOCENT PLATTER WRECKED BEAUTIFUL CLATTER CRIMSON REDDISH REGIONAL GLITTER OBVIOUSLY SALOMES BLIGHTER STRANGE DOUBTLESS CLUTTER LAUGHTER CLEARING GOODLOOKING LIGHTER SLAUGHTER SEVERAL

HUNGOVER INNOCENT BEAUTIFUL REGIONAL OBVIOUSLY BLIGHTER DOUBTLESS LAUGHTER CLEARING GOODLOOKING SLAUGHTER

BEAUTIFUL OBVIOUSLY DOUBTLESS GOODLOOKING SLAUGHTER

GOODLOOKING

…this is a very nice investigation of a very nice idea, thank you :-)…

Thank you